Monthly Archives July 2010

‘Have At It, Boys’ Becomes ‘Keep It Quiet, Boys’

Brandon Reed

Brandon Reed

By Brandon Reed
Posted in Columns 7/30/10

Reports from the Associated Press this week said that two of NASCAR’s top tier drivers were handed down stiff financial penalties recently for making critical comments publicly about the racing series.

In other words, after telling them “boys, have at it” in the off season, it was followed by “boys, keep your traps shut.”

This move has been justified by some since other big league sports have taken the same path over the years.

A Chat With Jack Etheridge

Jack Etheridge accepts the trophy and a handshake for a win at Atlanta's Peach Bowl in 1951.

By Eddie Samples
Posted in Feature Stories 7/23/10

Jack Etheridge was a Georgia native, and lived in Mableton, Georgia, just west of Atlanta.  Jack was married to his wife, Roma, for 65 years before his passing in 2000.

Jack had an interesting life, which included 20 years as a race car driver.  He retired from behind the wheel in 1954, saying he felt it was time to find a real job.

Jocko Flocko, Race Driver

Tim Flock and his 1953 co-driver, Jocko Flocko. Photo courtesy Frances Flock

By Brandon Reed
Posted in Feature Stories 7/16/10

When the American automobile racing scene was in its infancy, having a passenger in a racing car was a common thing to see, as drivers would have “ride along” mechanics to help them during races.

These mechanics would diagnose any problems with the car, as well as to warn the driver when someone was approaching them from behind or preparing to make a pass.

The Legend Of The Peach Bowl

Built in 1949, the Peach Bowl Speedway was one of the most important and historic tracks in Georgia.

Built in 1949, the Peach Bowl Speedway was one of the most important and historic tracks in Georgia. Photo courtesy GRHOF

By Mike Bell
Posted in Feature Stories 7/9/10

One of the victims of the New South and the ever-expanding boundaries of the New South “Capital” was the Peach Bowl Speedway on Brady Avenue in Northwest Atlanta.

It all started when Roy Shoemaker built the small quarter-mile oval for midget racing.  He spent some $100,000 to $150,000 to build a full dirt track with seats for 5,000 fans, a large pit area off the backstretch and acres of free parking.

Reflections One Year In And Other Observations

Brandon Reed

Brandon Reed

By Brandon Reed
Posted in Columns 7/2/10

First off, let me start this column by saying a big thank you to all our readers!

Georgia Racing History.com turned one year old on June 26.  So far, the response has been phenomenal, and we can’t say thank you enough!

The birth of this website actually started more than a year prior to the website being officially launched.  It began as a conversation between myself and Mike Bell, the historian and CEO of the Georgia Auto Racing Hall of Fame Association.

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